Journal of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 36  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 386--390

Avoidance of deep anesthesia and artificial airways in 1000 neonates and infants using regional anesthesia: A retrospective observational analysis


Vrushali C Ponde, Dilip N Chavan, Ankit P Desai, Anuya A Gursale, Vinit V Bedekar, Kiran A Puranik 
 Children Anaesthesia Services, Department of Anaesthesia, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Vrushali C Ponde
Amber Croft 302, Ambedkar Road, Bandra West, Mumbai - 400 050, Maharashtra
India

Background and Aims: Current concerns related to the anesthetic neurotoxicity have brought a renewed interest in regional anesthesia. Regional anesthesia reduces the need for opioids and inhalational anesthetics. The immaturity of the neonatal and infant nervous system may render them more prone to neurotoxicity. We describe our technique of anesthesia, which minimizes the exposure to general anesthetics and reduces airway instrumentation because the operability is rendered by the regional block. Material and Methods: This was a retrospective case series of neonates and infants undergoing common surface surgeries. We describe our technique of anesthesia where regional blocks are the mainstay. We also put up the data pertaining to block effectiveness, technique, end-tidal sevoflurane concentration and complications. Results: One thousand patients, including neonates and infants, received central and peripheral nerve blockade. The failure rate in upper extremity blocks 0% without complications. 86.12% were given under ultrasonography (USG) guidance and 13.89% were given with peripheral nerve stimulation. The failure rate of sciatic block single shot and continuous was 0%. 92.53% were given with USG guidance while 7.46% received sciatic with nerve stimulation technique. Failure rate of caudal epidural block was 0. 78% requiring a rescue analgesic, 1.4% had blood in the needle. Out of the caudals, 33.33% were done with USG guidance and 66.67% blocks were given with traditional techniques. Out of the 322 penile + ring blocks given by traditional method, 1 block failed requiring rescue analgesics. The mean sevoflurane concentration was 1.2 +/- 0.32. Conclusion: It is feasible to conduct surface surgeries in the most vulnerable population such as neonates and infants under regional anesthesia without intubation and airway instrumentation.


How to cite this article:
Ponde VC, Chavan DN, Desai AP, Gursale AA, Bedekar VV, Puranik KA. Avoidance of deep anesthesia and artificial airways in 1000 neonates and infants using regional anesthesia: A retrospective observational analysis.J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol 2020;36:386-390


How to cite this URL:
Ponde VC, Chavan DN, Desai AP, Gursale AA, Bedekar VV, Puranik KA. Avoidance of deep anesthesia and artificial airways in 1000 neonates and infants using regional anesthesia: A retrospective observational analysis. J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Apr 11 ];36:386-390
Available from: https://www.joacp.org/article.asp?issn=0970-9185;year=2020;volume=36;issue=3;spage=386;epage=390;aulast=Ponde;type=0